Here’s what you should know about the new potential 100-year agreement for Denver’s National Western Center

Denver city officials would exercise most of the control over a new National Western Center campus authority under a proposed 50-year agreement that was unveiled Tuesday for the $1.1 billion project.

The city and its main partners have talked for two years or more about some of the aspects wrapped into the new collection of documents, but others are fleshed out for the first time — including how they would handle naming rights, split event-booking duties to make the center profitable and set up a community investment fund to help the area’s downtrodden neighborhoods.

Jerry Diaz performs with a long lasso during the 23rd annual Mexican Rodeo Extravaganza during the 111th annual National Western Stock Show on January 8, 2017 in Denver, Colorado. Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post

Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post

Jerry Diaz performs with a long lasso during the 23rd annual Mexican Rodeo Extravaganza during the 111th annual National Western Stock Show on January 8, 2017 in Denver, Colorado.

With two potential 25-year renewals, the “framework agreement” could chart the course of the expanded campus for a century.

The contract has been inked with the city’s main project partners: the Western Stock Show Association, which has run the annual stock show and rodeo on the site for 111 years, and Colorado State University, which hopes to tie in its academic programs, open a sports medicine clinic for horses and help make the campus into an agricultural innovation center that aids Colorado’s food industry.

Mayor Michael Hancock’s Office of the National Western Center submitted the binder-filling agreement to the City Council this week and provided a media briefing.

The council’s land use committee advanced the proposed arrangement Tuesday morning, making it eligible for a final vote as soon as Sept. 18.

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